Palenque: the indigenous heart of mexico.

Palenque. In the middle of a rainforest in southern Mexico. It’s not just a cactus country with a beach but also popular for all the natives they once lived here. Still some do. But covered under trees and populated by monkeys you feel like meeting King Lui in the Jungle Book. A mystic place so pretty with a spirit and open minding.

Why did people live here and now not anymore when the folk was so civilized? Why would a whole city run away? An earthquake, volcanic eruption, a war or did the european discoverers destroyed this beautiful living natives? All this isn’t for sure, but all the ruins give the place this special spirit.

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In the middle of a rainforest, when you passed some wterfalls like Misol-Ha there is a big city of the past: Palenque hiding under huge trees where now only monkeys and birds live. Want to see monkeys? Just follow the noise. The howler monkeys just howl as much as you would expect of them. Up in the trees hiding. And all the half eaten Avocados and Mangos on the ground give you a hind what direction to go.

But first the ruins. To get to Palenque it’s a long ride through the rainforest and the mountainy countryside of Chiapas, southern Mexico. And than there is a huge glade just somewhere in the middle of the rainforest. I lost breath when I first saw the ruins. So majestetic buildungs infront of the trees. The grey stones shine in the sun and the contrast to all the green is stunning.

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When I saw all the ruins in the rainforest I got remembered of Disneys the Jungle Book. It’s not Cambodia or India but still amazing. Palenque is almost 1600 years old and only a little bit is discovered. Most of the city is still covered by the jungle. Also a lot of buildings where made out of wood which is rotted already. The natives called Mayas lived here for almost 300 years and all around meso-america till the spainish’ arrived. But you can still find Mayas around southern Mexico, Belize and Guatemala. The culture of the Maya was huge. The most important food there produced was corn. What would we be without corn? But also the mathematics and the writing was very important. And the Maya were huge with handcrafts. They were creaters of arts, drawings, jewelry and architecture. The step pyramids could reach up to 75 meters high.

But also the natives all over the world lived/live with the nature and got food, protection and materials to build things and just live from nature. In Palnque are many canals between the ruins and the next big river isn’t far. The old assumed indigenous name of Palenque is Lakamha’. What means big water. And how could a rainforest or jungle be without water or how could live any humans without?

It’s almost like you could feel the far gone natives all around you. Not just because of the huge ruins but when you walk some little path down and up again. It’s still covered in the jungle and I thought it was a little mystic between the trees where houses were standing. The trees have grown tall and the ruins are so small away from the palast on the glade. Real people lived here. Kind of scary. I could feel the indigenous spirit around.

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And now I want to go to Cambodia and see more places like this. But first another travel is booked already. How do you feel about travel? So many journeys to go on and adventures to live. My heard is always full of wanderlust…

Where are you going next? What’s your favorite place? Why are we travelling? But remember: not all those who wander are lost.

Interessted into my current and next travels? Check it out.

Sending some love,

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Pia, x

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